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CUT FACTORY SPRINGS????? GOOD or BAD??????

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CUT FACTORY SPRINGS????? GOOD or BAD??????

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    CUT FACTORY SPRINGS????? GOOD or BAD??????

    Well, I've talked to afew people and gotten different responses, So now I'm coming to the home of 2nd gen integras with my question. Cutting factory springs to drop your car, Is it bad for your car? Since the spring doesnt sit straight in the cup. My friend did his on a 95 civic and they wanted to lean over when sat in to place in the strut. I know once there in the strut & with the weight of the car on them, They're not going anywhere, But will it effect your camber worst than regular drop springs?? THANKS FOR THE HELP!!!!

    #2
    dude...its not worth it....just buy some springs...cheaper in the long run

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      #3
      Better to just get a used set of lowering springs if you want to lower the car when you're low on funds.

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        #4
        Cutting your springs is about the worst thing you could do. Not only will they sit wrong, your spring rate will be awful. Not to mention you can get a brand new set of H&R sport springs for ~$150.

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          #5
          91jdmteg


          Join Date: 07 Nov 2004
          Location: Hot Springs Arkansas
          Trader Rating: (0)




          Heat em



          ok...not funny.... sorry

          I have a pair...PAIR=2 of RS-R springs I can sell you for like 15 bucks... they're rear only though...

          Like everyone says...don't modify stock springs...get other ones...cheaper in the long run.

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            #6
            BAD BAD BAD... better off in 4 by mode!

            hella choppy ride

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              #7
              wurdity word wurd

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                #8
                On most of the car shows I watch on TV like Overhauling and Monster Garage they always cut the springs. I think you should cut them and see if you like it or not. If you don't like it then just buy lowering springs.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by AngryMidget
                  On most of the car shows I watch on TV like Overhauling and Monster Garage they always cut the springs. I think you should cut them and see if you like it or not. If you don't like it then just buy lowering springs.
                  I guess you should just believe everything you see on TV shows and apply it to your own car then. I only see zero positive and a whole lot of negative aspect to cutting your springs. I would expect myself to be exhiled from this forum if I ever did that. Just really not worth for how cheap springs are. Cutting them will completely destroy your spring rates and it will ride like shit. Not to mention it's the most ghetto thing ever. You may see it on shows like Monster Garage or Overhaulin' but how often do you see those guys paying attention to suspension. They're usually gear heads who don't know jack about suspension theory.

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                    #10
                    These shows always have disclaimers at the end anyway... "Not all information is provided blah blah blah"

                    Monster garage? I've watched that maybe twice. Isn't it all just to do something wild and see if it will work ONCE? :p

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by AngryMidget
                      On most of the car shows I watch on TV like Overhauling and Monster Garage they always cut the springs. I think you should cut them and see if you like it or not. If you don't like it then just buy lowering springs.
                      Umm im sorry but overhaulin DOES NOT cut the springs. I dont think chip foose would associate himself with some hooptie with cut springs. Now maybe pimp my ride, but not overhaulin

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                        #12
                        I watch Monster Garage regularly, and yes the purpose is to build the outrageous thing and get it to work one, hence the cut springs. And with pimp my ride, i dont' think anything else has to be said...

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by pdc125
                          I guess you should just believe everything you see on TV shows and apply it to your own car then. I only see zero positive and a whole lot of negative aspect to cutting your springs. I would expect myself to be exhiled from this forum if I ever did that. Just really not worth for how cheap springs are. Cutting them will completely destroy your spring rates and it will ride like shit. Not to mention it's the most ghetto thing ever. You may see it on shows like Monster Garage or Overhaulin' but how often do you see those guys paying attention to suspension. They're usually gear heads who don't know jack about suspension theory.
                          It seems clear to me that you don't actually know anything about cutting springs, but maybe i'm just mis-reading or mis-interpretting what you wrote. So please, clear some things up for me...

                          1) Are you sure there are zero positives to cutting your springs?
                          2) How will cutting the springs "completely destroy your spring rates"? Please tell me HOW cutting them will affect/change the spring rate.
                          3) Why will the car ride like shit?

                          I can't help but give my view on the 3 above questions:
                          1) There is a positive, actually 2 positives to cutting your springs. The first is a lower center of gravity. The second is that you'll have stiffer springs.

                          2) Cutting your springs will NOT "completely destroy your spring rates" Cutting your springs will raise the spring rate. You can find forumulas online which will help you calculate a springs spring rate based on its dimensions.

                          3) Most likely if you cut your springs the car will ride like shit, but that will be more your fault than the springs fault. The car will probably ride like shit because you didn't pay attention to other factors like shocks, and suspension travel....


                          Now, with all that said, I still don't recommend you cut your springs. As has been stated, you can get lowering springs for cheap. The spring rates will be more precise, they'll fit better...etc...etc... BUT in some situations cutting your springs is just fine, and can be an effective way of raising your spring rate and lowering your car. Usually however its only worthwhile if you're in a situation where you don't have any other options. Which for you is not the case, you have MANY MANY suspension options out there for the DA....so why not take advantage of them?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Another option

                            Originally posted by 91jdmteg
                            Well, I've talked to afew people and gotten different responses, So now I'm coming to the home of 2nd gen integras with my question. Cutting factory springs to drop your car, Is it bad for your car? Since the spring doesnt sit straight in the cup. My friend did his on a 95 civic and they wanted to lean over when sat in to place in the strut. I know once there in the strut & with the weight of the car on them, They're not going anywhere, But will it effect your camber worst than regular drop springs?? THANKS FOR THE HELP!!!!

                            If you want a lowered stance still, then thread the shock piston pushrod, and get two grade 8 bolts, and bolt those ontop of the shock tower on the pushrod, and use the lower bolt as a ride height lowering bolt, and top bolt as a locking bolt.
                            (If this doesn't make any sense to you, PM me. This is a method of controlling/adjusting the static ride height of the vehicle, by shortening the suspension travel on the shock pushrod.) This way, you can have a lowered ride without the harsh ride, and still not hit the bump-stops.

                            There are a couple of way of doing this. Although it requires a bit of fabrication.
                            The shock piston pushrod is further threaded, and two bolts and washer which are sitting between the top-hat, and the shock tower bracket.
                            Below the shock tower bracket, the shock pushrod is further threaded.

                            (Although not too much—so that the threads do not pass through the shock tube assembly, thus destroying the seals upon full compression or bottoming out. Although a bump stop with the same height (if not greater), as the length of the exposed threads, further reduces the tendency for the pushrod threads to enter past the shock seals.)

                            Below the shock tower bracket, two locking bolts (which lock toward each other), push snugly against the bottom of the shock tower bracket. Between the bottom two locking bolts and the shock tower bracket is the washer which pushed against the rubber grommets inside of the shock tower bracket assembly.

                            Yes, depending on the springs that is used, this increases the ramp-rate of the spring, (or rather amplifies a progressive spring.)

                            The shock tube assembly itself is not touched.
                            In order to lower the two top locking bolts, a spring compressor should be used, (because the spring will offer considerable resistance to compression.)

                            The problem with lowering a car with shortened springs, where the spring does not extend from the bottom of the shock, to the top of the shock, when the shock is at full rebound (or extension), is that upon a hard rebound proceeding bump-travel, is that the kinetic energy from the springs compression will shoot the shock piston pushrod upward PAST the limit of where the spring contacts BOTH the top and the bottom of the shock. (This can have disruptive effects to the chassis during steady state turning.)
                            Yes, this can be band-aided by the using shocks with a slower and more resistant rebound, but does not solve the problem.


                            Here is a link to DSMtuners.com, where I discussed how to do this. In the thread I've posted a diagram that I put together. Cut and paste.

                            http://dsmtuners.com/forums/showthread.php?t=153159

                            Comment


                              #15
                              If it was not already obvious, the method can allow you to lower your car on stock springs and shocks, without cutting your springs at all, and without having the shock pushrod sitting half-way in the shock body, when lowered.
                              Although this does not take into account the adverse effects of toe change, and static negative camber change. (Camber kits will be needed to correct it.)

                              This method also alows you to adjust the static ride height, as well as tune the spring rate, with increasing it's ramp rate.

                              (Although, Ideally, the method which I mentioned above, is best done with Koni Yellows, with H&R springs, with Ground Control sleeves, perches and lock-rings. As well as front and rear camber kits. Nonetheless, the modification can be done with the OEM spring and shock combination.)

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                                #16
                                I wasn't going to do it. I was just wondering to goods and bads of it. Thanks

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                                  #17
                                  good

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                                    #18
                                    UCSlugRacerX, do you mean nut, not bolt? The pushrod is threaded, so you can't attach another threaded bolt to it without drilling.

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                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by strikeback03
                                      UCSlugRacerX, do you mean nut, not bolt? The pushrod is threaded, so you can't attach another threaded bolt to it without drilling.
                                      You are correct. (I wish I could go back and edit that.) A nut should be threaded onto the pushrod, not a bolt.

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by Nino
                                        good
                                        Not just good...great.

                                        Comment


                                          #21
                                          Originally posted by Colin
                                          Please tell me HOW cutting them will affect/change the spring rate.
                                          yo, colin. It changes them because there are less coils and so the metal that is there has to do more of the work than it used to. cut springs == stiffer springs. I'd have to bust out the formula to tell you how much stiffer, though.

                                          Cutting springs isnt a bad thing if you know what you are doing. Just dont heat them.

                                          Ben

                                          Comment


                                            #22
                                            i'm riding on cut springs. i used stock shocks/springs with only 30K miles on them but it rides the same as it did before with 150K miles on the old shocks/springs. it rides just like stock... and out of all the people who have been in my car, nobody has said it rides harsh, bouncy, choppy or anything like that.

                                            edit - i just did it because i had that extra set of springs/shocks sitting in the basement so when i got really bored one day, i cut them and put them on. yes i can afford real springs and shocks, but why buy them when i'm happy with the ride now? i cant drive again until feb. anyway so i dont really care right now

                                            Comment


                                              #23
                                              Originally posted by Ben Ogle
                                              yo, colin. It changes them because there are less coils and so the metal that is there has to do more of the work than it used to. cut springs == stiffer springs. I'd have to bust out the formula to tell you how much stiffer, though.

                                              Cutting springs isnt a bad thing if you know what you are doing. Just dont heat them.

                                              Ben
                                              haha, ben, I know how it effects the spring rates... I was asking the guy who I quoted in my post. I was asking him because he clearly had no idea

                                              Comment


                                                #24
                                                Originally posted by G2sleeperstyle
                                                i'm riding on cut springs. i used stock shocks/springs with only 30K miles on them but it rides the same as it did before with 150K miles on the old shocks/springs. it rides just like stock... and out of all the people who have been in my car, nobody has said it rides harsh, bouncy, choppy or anything like that.

                                                edit - i just did it because i had that extra set of springs/shocks sitting in the basement so when i got really bored one day, i cut them and put them on. yes i can afford real springs and shocks, but why buy them when i'm happy with the ride now? i cant drive again until feb. anyway so i dont really care right now
                                                Please discredit the entire post I quoted above. This is utter bullshit. He supplies no objective analysis as to why it rides OK, but rather he just subjectivly SAYS it performs OK. There is absolutly no way the car would ride like stock.

                                                (Suspension travel is shortended, more negative camber is added, the toe is changed, and the top mounting brackets contact with the bump stops sooner, upon bottoming out.)

                                                Comment


                                                  #25
                                                  Instead of posting negativity you could at least ask him to expand on his explanation a little bit more, maybe?

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