Readme

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oil viscosity and static compression

Collapse
X

Oil viscosity and static compression

Collapse
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Oil viscosity and static compression

    Tomorrow HybridCRX and I will begin disassembling my Lsvtec to install new rings. A few minutes ago, I did a compression test and the numbers were as follows:

    Cylinder #, and PSI
    1. 250 PSI
    2. 250 PSI
    3. 270 PSI
    4. 260 PSI

    This is after I increased the viscosity of the oil, by running 20w 50 synthetic, and CD2 anti-oil burning additive, and 8 cylinder restore, Smoke-Fix additive, and changing the oil filter. (The original owner used 10w 30 non-synthetic.)

    Approximately 3 weeks ago, I did a compression test on the engine before I bought the car. The compression numbers were as follows:

    Cylinder #, and PSI
    1. 260 PSI
    2. 255 PSI
    3. 220 PSI
    4. 225 PSI

    Also, the spark plug on number 3 cylinder is always heavily caked with oil when I remove it and clean it.
    The engine burns 1 quart oil every 100 miles, and that condition has not changed.
    Along with heavy amounts of smoke emitting from the exhaust pipe when I lay on the throttle, or engine brake.
    My question is, why did the #3 cylinder increase 50 PSI, and cylinders 1 and 2 decreased? I’ve used restore before on a Honda Civic with bad compression, and it did absolutely nothing to the static compression. (Although I did only use the 4 cylinder quantity of Restore.)

    Could the increase in oil viscosity have increased the static compression of the #3 cylinder with horrible piston-ring-blow-by, by 50 PSI? If so, why would it do that?
    I’m still perplexed as to why the compression increased a substantial amount, when usually the case, is that compression worsens over time.
    (BTW, the pistons are SRP 11.5:1, bored 81.5, with unconfirmed brand rings.)

    Any explanations are appreciated.

    -Andrew
Working...
X